Blog: my research in simple words

Check also my twitter summaries! See all below the publications (click here).

Socially induced negative emotions elicit neural activity in the mentalizing network in a subsequent inhibitory task

You can find the original article here (open access). In this study, we induced emotions towards pictures of other people in our participants with an economic trust game. Participants got to like one player, dislike another, and have neutral affect for the third (no interaction in the game). You may already know this design from our previousContinue reading “Socially induced negative emotions elicit neural activity in the mentalizing network in a subsequent inhibitory task”

Socially induced negative affective knowledge modulates early face perception but not gaze cueing of attention

You can find the original article here (open access). In this study, we made participants like and dislike other people by using a social interactive game, and then we checked how their brains responded to pictures of the co-players. In fact, there were no other players, just algorithms designed to play “fair” or not. However,Continue reading “Socially induced negative affective knowledge modulates early face perception but not gaze cueing of attention”

Pupillary Responses to Faces Are Modulated by Familiarity and Rewarding Context

Every day we see dozens of faces and we are experts in their processing. Faces carry a lot of information, one of which is feedback and reward for our actions. For example, when we do something and our friend smiles in response, it’s rewarding. On the other side, sometimes we see people smile, but thisContinue reading “Pupillary Responses to Faces Are Modulated by Familiarity and Rewarding Context”

Multidimensional View on Social and Non-social Rewards

Social rewards are often compared in experimental designs with non-social ones: a popular pair is money (non-social) vs. a smile (social). However, we often forget that money and smiles differ on many more dimensions than just sociality. For example, money is tangible, but a smile is not. Can we then draw informative conclusions about theContinue reading “Multidimensional View on Social and Non-social Rewards”

Autistic Traits Affect Reward Anticipation but not Reception

Persons with autism may be experiencing troubles interacting socially with others because of a decreased sensitivity of their brains to social stimuli (like faces, speech, gestures, etc.). Because autism is a spectrum reaching from neurotypical persons with little or no autistic traits on one end and low-functioning persons with autism on the other, we measuredContinue reading “Autistic Traits Affect Reward Anticipation but not Reception”